poet William Blake

William Blake

#10 on top 500 poets

William Blake Quotes

  • ''I went to the Garden of Love,
    And saw what I never had seen:
    A Chapel was built in the midst,
    Where I used to play on the green.
    And the gates of this Chapel were shut,
    And 'Thou shalt not' writ over the door;''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. The Garden of Love (l. 1-6). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    5 person liked.
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  • ''Then my verse I dishonour, my pictures despise,
    My person degrade & my temper chastise;
    And the pen is my terror, the pencil my shame;
    And my talents I bury, and dead is my fame.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. letter, Aug. 16, 1803. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    1 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''And I saw it was filled with graves,
    And tomb-stones where flowers should be;
    And Priests in black gowns were walking their rounds,
    And binding with briars my joys and desires.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. The Garden of Love (l. 9-12). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    3 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''Since the French Revolution Englishmen are all intermeasurable one by another, certainly a happy state of agreement to which I for one do not agree.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. Letter, October 24, 1910, to George Cumberland. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    8 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''Every harlot was a virgin once.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. The Gates of Paradise, epilogue, l. 3 (c. 1818), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    8 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''Commerce is so far from being beneficial to arts, or to empire, that it is destructive of both, as all their history shows, for the above reason of individual merit being its great hatred. Empires flourish till they become commercial, and then they are scattered abroad to the four winds.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. Public address, c. 1810, in Blake's notebook. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    3 person liked.
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  • ''Pity would be no more,
    If we did not make somebody poor;
    And mercy no more could be,
    If all were as happy as we;''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. The Human Abstract (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    5 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''To me this world is all one continued vision of fancy or imagination, and I feel flattered when I am told so. What is it sets Homer, Virgil and Milton in so high a rank of art? Why is Bible more entertaining and instructive than any other book? Is it not because they are addressed to the imagination, which is spiritual sensation, and but mediately to the understanding or reason?''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. letter, Aug. 23, 1799. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    2 person liked.
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  • ''The gods of the earth and sea
    Sought through nature to find this tree.
    But their search was all in vain:
    There grows one in the human brain.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. The Human Abstract (l. 21-24). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    2 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''Some say that happiness is not good for mortals, & they ought to be answered that sorrow is not fit for immortals & is utterly useless to any one; a blight never does good to a tree, & if a blight kill not a tree but it still bear fruit, let none say that the fruit was in consequence of the blight.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. letter, Oct. 7, 1803. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    4 person liked.
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Best Poem of William Blake

The Angel

I dreamt a dream! What can it mean?
And that I was a maiden Queen
Guarded by an Angel mild:
Witless woe was ne'er beguiled!

And I wept both night and day,
And he wiped my tears away;
And I wept both day and night,
And hid from him my heart's delight.

So he took his wings, and fled;
Then the morn blushed rosy red.
I dried my tears, and armed my fears
With ten-thousand shields and spears.

Soon my Angel came again;
I was armed, he came in vain;
For the time of youth was fled,
And grey hairs were on my head.

Read the full of The Angel

To Tirzah

Whate'er is Born of Mortal Birth
Must be consumed with the Earth
To rise from Generation free:
Then what have I to do with thee?

The Sexes sprung from Shame & Pride,
Blow'd in the morn, in evening died;
But Mercy chang'd Death into Sleep;
The Sexes rose to work & weep.